Lead Poisoning PreventionBack in February, Alpine’s president Ron Peik caught a flight down to Washington, DC. He was joining the National Center for Healthy Housing (NCHH) at their annual “Hill Day.” Ron and thirty industry leaders from across the U.S. met with over eighty Congressional offices on Capitol Hill to discuss the importance of sufficient support for healthy housing. The appalling situations in Flint, MI and hundreds of other American cities and towns have made lead poisoning and other environmental concerns big topics of discussion.

 

According to NCHH’s website,

NCHH’s Hill Day works to raise the profile of healthy homes issues and recommend full funding for three crucially important federal programs – CDC’s Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, and CDC’s National Asthma Control Program.

At this event, members met with legislators and their staff to discuss policy regarding lead paint, lead poisoning, and healthy housing issues. Attendees also shared their personal experiences with environmental issues, explained the work they carry out to minimize these hazards, and described ways these types of programs have helped them. They emphasized the importance of offering proper assistance to homeowners, children and others affected by lead poisoning and other risks. Due to the complex and highly regulated nature of lead and other environmental hazards, it is especially essential to maintain robust, efficient support for those affected.

Increased funding alone, though, will not solve these problems. Ample education and monitoring of risks in conjunction with well-informed use of these funds are key. As the main programs in this industry, the CDC’s Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, and the CDC’s National Asthma Control Program were all discussed as good candidates for increased support. The event was a great opportunity to take an active role in the lead and environmental hazards industry.

For more information on the National Center for Healthy Housing, check out their website: www.nchh.org