Alpine Environmental https://www.alpine-environmental.com Alpine Environmental provides environmental services Mon, 21 Nov 2016 14:57:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 118697102 Crawl Space Encapsulation https://www.alpine-environmental.com/crawl-space-encapsulation/ Fri, 18 Nov 2016 22:00:17 +0000 https://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1744 Most of us are aware of the potential for mold problems in basements. Mold in a basement is often noticeable, since we frequently store things or spend time in our basements. But did you know that if your home is built not on a basement but on a crawl space, that you can have the […]

The post Crawl Space Encapsulation appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
Most of us are aware of the potential for mold problems in basements.

Mold in a basement is often noticeable, since we frequently store things or spend time in our basements. But did you know that if your home is built not on a basement but on a crawl space, that you can have the same nasty mold spore issues in your home as you could with a basement? Fortunately, crawl space encapsulation is a great method of protecting your home from mold growth due to a damp crawl space.crawl space encapsulation

Crawl spaces are quite different from basements. Typically they are 2 to 5 feet tall, have concrete walls, are not accessible from the inside of the home, and often have dirt floors. They are usually dank, dark areas that people prefer to keep “out of sight, out of mind.”

But crawl spaces should not be neglected. Unlike homeowners, mold finds them  They are wonderful places for all kinds of mold species to live happy lives, while affecting the air quality in the home above and causing various health issues. Even though the crawl space doesn’t really seem to be “attached to” your living area, it is. Mold spores easily find their way through cracks and spaces up into the home above. In addition, people sometimes use crawl spaces for storage, but wooden and cardboard surfaces are great places for mold to grow if the environment is damp.

crawlspace encapsulationThe answer to this problem is to seal off, or “encapsulate”, the crawl space.  This process will isolate its environment from the living space above, as well as prevent future mold.  Here are the steps that the mold remediation specialist will take:

  1. Remove any mold that is already there. This is done be applying fungicide to all exposed surfaces, and coating all exposed wood with an anti-microbial paint.
  1. Extremely thick (12 millimeters) plastic is used to cover the floor and walls of the crawlspace, and it is fastened very securely all around. This plastic also has an anti-microbial coating to provide an extra layer of protection against future mold invasions.
  1. Insulate the crawl space walls and seal up any spaces or cracks where air can come in. Air brings moisture, and moisture causes mold. The access door is also insulated and air-tight sealed.
  1. The final step is to make sure the air is conditioned and moisture constantly removed, from this point on. This is usually done by installing a de-humidifier, which can keep the relative humidity below 50%, necessary for preventing mold.

The result is a dry, clean, sealed-off crawl space that you can safely use for storage, but most importantly, that you can feel safe living above.

The post Crawl Space Encapsulation appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1744
Attic Mold & Removal Methods https://www.alpine-environmental.com/attic-mold/ Fri, 23 Sep 2016 21:48:42 +0000 https://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1712 When you think of mold, you generally picture damp, dark basements. But attic mold is actually just as common – and much easier to miss. Even if it’s in an unused place like the attic, mold growing on the sheathing of your attic can actually cause serious health and structural problems. The physical effects of […]

The post Attic Mold & Removal Methods appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
When you think of mold, you generally picture damp, dark basements.

But attic mold is actually just as common – and much easier to miss. Even if it’s in an unused place like the attic, mold growing on the sheathing of your attic can actually cause serious health and structural problems. The physical effects of mold exposure depend on your own health situation as well as the amount of mold you are exposed to. Symptoms of mold exposure can include coughing, wheezing, headaches, asthma and throat irritation. Additionally, excessive mold growth and improper ventilation can wreak havoc on roofs and ceilings.attic mold

Mold grows on roof sheathing in attics when warm air from the house gets trapped in the attic due to inadequate insulation or insufficient ventilation (not enough soffit and/or ridge venting). When it gets cold outside, the temperature of the roof sheathing drops below the dew point causing moisture to form on the sheathing, just like when moisture forms on the outside of a cold drink on a warm humid day. This combination of moisture and wood provides the perfect setting for mold growth. Attic mold starts as a white or gray fuzzy growth and can spread quickly. During the coldest part of winter or hottest part of summer, it goes dormant and turns black. When optimal growing conditions return, the dormant mold will come alive again and start growing and spreading.

Now this might sound pretty dismal, but fear not! A variety of solutions exist to treat both the mold and the underlying issue. Mold removal methods include applying disinfectants, scrubbing with fungicides, and even total removal of the affected components. Dry ice blasting is another more unusual but extremely effective and non-destructive mold remediation method.

The dry ice blasting process consists of a compressed air gun that blasts rice-sized dry ice pellets at high speeds. attic moldWhen the dry ice strikes the surface, it goes directly from a solid to a gas. The transition causes the particles to expand up to 800 times their original size, and this rapid expansion beneath the mold contaminant forces its removal from the surface. The airborne particles are then removed by the use of HEPA filtered negative air machines.

Once the mold has been taken care of, it’s time to repair any complications that triggered the growth. Treating the mold is important, of course, but fixing the primary issue causing the mold to grow is key to maintaining a healthy home.  This can be anything from poor ventilation to a leaky roof. Although it’s often easier and cheaper to simply get rid of the mold, this step is essential for eliminating future growth. Here at Alpine, we don’t only remove your mold problem, we determine the root cause and work with you to prevent future mold growth in your attic.

The post Attic Mold & Removal Methods appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1712
Period & Historic Restoration: Is There a Difference? https://www.alpine-environmental.com/historic-restoration/ Mon, 01 Aug 2016 03:58:04 +0000 http://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1634 History is fascinating. And we’re not just talking ancient history. Here at Alpine, we like to think that every period has its own flavor of “historical.” But in renovation terms, historic restoration often evokes visions of expensive Victorians or Revolutionary War-era Colonials. So we decided to call it “period restoration” instead. The reality is that […]

The post Period & Historic Restoration: Is There a Difference? appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
History is fascinating.

And we’re not just talking ancient history. Here at Alpine, we like to think that every period hahistoric restorations its own flavor of “historical.” But in renovation terms, historic restoration often evokes visions of expensive Victorians or Revolutionary War-era Colonials. So we decided to call it “period restoration” instead. The reality is that many homes actually require unique hardware, windows, or other features to maintain their period charm. But unfortunately, many homeowners who fall into this in-between category think of historic restoration as something that doesn’t apply to them.

The reality is that more houses count as period than not. The last thing you want to do is buy a vintage house because you fell in love with the charm, then accidentally diminish that by throwing up some vinyl windows. Or purchase an old home to flip and realize those modern fixtures you bought totally clash with the existing design. These little details have a huge impact on the value of a property. If it involves a sale, this can mean less interest and less ROI.

From the 18th century Colonel Barrett House to a quaint cottage built in the 1950’s, we cater to every home’s distinctive pershistoric restorationonality. When undertaking any renovation project (whether it involves lead, mold, or just plain construction), it’s vital to maintain or improve the value of the property. Using materials and hardware that “fit” the era of the house is key. Many off-the-shelf trim or hardware options diminish the value of the home. If cost is on your mind, have no fear – there are still reasonably-priced options that are high quality and historically accurate.

A combination of environmental skill, craftsmanship, and a love of architecture is important. For us, it meant that a homeowner wouldn’t have to lose the cherished details in their 1930’s Cape during renovation. And a different time, it reassured preservationists, working to restore a 1805 Rockport church, that the ravages of time could be undone safely and effectively.

 

The post Period & Historic Restoration: Is There a Difference? appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1634
EPA’s RRP Rule https://www.alpine-environmental.com/rrp-rule-lead-paint/ Thu, 16 Jun 2016 14:08:37 +0000 http://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1582 Home improvement projects are rewarding but challenging. Add in lead paint and the risks to both workers and residents, and you’ve got yourself a pretty complicated situation. The EPA’s Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) Rule helps set some guidelines to ensure a lead-safe safe project – whether it’s a full renovation or just a paint job. […]

The post EPA’s RRP Rule appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
Home improvement projects are rewarding but challenging. Add in lead paint and home renovation, rrp rulethe risks to both workers and residents, and you’ve got yourself a pretty complicated situation. The EPA’s Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) Rule helps set some guidelines to ensure a lead-safe safe project – whether it’s a full
renovation or just a paint job. Since it only takes a tiny amount of lead dust to poison a child, it’s important to follow lead-safe procedures. To avoid accidental contamination and lead poisoning, the EPA’s RRP Rule went into effect in April of 2010. The law mandates that any contractor working on a residential building, built pre-1978, must be lead-safe certified and maintain lead-safe work practices.

According to the EPA website:

EPA’s Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule (RRP Rule) requires that firms performing renovation, repair, and painting projects that disturb lead-based paint in homes, child care facilities and pre-schools built before 1978 have their firm certified by EPA (or an EPA authorized state), use certified renovators who are trained by EPA-approved training providers and follow lead-safe work practices.

Different from lead paint abatement where the purpose of the job is to remove lead paint hazards, RRP projects are just basic renovation and painting projects that involve disturbing lead-painted surfaces. Any project that disturbs over 20 square feet on the exterior, or over 6 square feet per room in the interiors falls under RRP work practices. Lead testing is not even required as long as all surfaces are assumed to be lead painted and lead-safe practices are followed. Everything from painting to plumbing can fall under this law if there is the possibility of lead paint being disturbed. The downside is that many contractors now have to deal with the added hassle of becoming RRP certified and licensed, but many of them choose to have the part of the project that actually disturbs the lead paint done by lead abatement contractors whose employees are trained and experienced with safely containing lead dust and protecting themselves every day. Then the general contractor can proceed with the job without worrying about lead paint issues.

To receive lead-safe certification, the individual must take an EPA-approved training course. Only one certified renovator is required on-site though, as long as others working receive on-the-job training and the site is properly prepped and contained. Before an RRP project is even started, occupants must be notified and given a Renovate Right pamphlet. This pamphlet summarizes the hazards of lead paint and how proper lead-safe jobsites should work. Once this is done, the work can begin. Like with lead abatement projects, precautions are taken by containing the construction spaces with poly sheeting, using HEPA air filters. Workers are protected by wearing HEPA-filtered respirators and Tyvek suits to keep the lead out of their systems.

Do you have a project that falls under this category? Let us know! As a Lead-Safe certified contractor, we’re happy to answer any questions or take on your RRP project.

The post EPA’s RRP Rule appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1582
Lead Abatement Costs & Contracts https://www.alpine-environmental.com/lead-abatement-costs/ Tue, 17 May 2016 22:52:34 +0000 http://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1483 Understanding lead abatement costs and contracts. The lead abatement world can be a foreign, confusing place. Strict yet confusing regulations and the stress of dealing with a toxic substance in your home make for a very taxing situation. To add to this, lead removal costs are difficult to define. To give you an idea, the average […]

The post Lead Abatement Costs & Contracts appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
lead abatement contractUnderstanding lead abatement costs and contracts.

The lead abatement world can be a foreign, confusing place. Strict yet confusing regulations and the stress of dealing with a toxic substance in your home make for a very taxing situation. To add to this, lead removal costs are difficult to define. To give you an idea, the average lead abatement costs for your typical residential home in Massachusetts is $17,000. However, prices vary significantly depending on many factors – local and state regulations, the property’s location, architectural style, and age among other things. To choose the right contractor for your job though, it’s important to know what to expect for costs and what to look for in the contract verbiage.

Many times a tempting low price from a contractor is accompanied by a proposal with very little detail about the exact work being done. Once that proposal becomes a contract, that lack of detail often translates into hidden costs since many things that a customer might expect to be included become “extras.” Not only can these unknowns cost you headaches, it can cost you dollars. The devil is in the details, and in this case the details are in the contract!

lead abatement costs

The above photo shows the clear line where the scraped paint meets the original paint and the damaged woodwork from the previous contractor while the below photo shows the trim after we went it to fix it.refinished trim

Unfortunately, not all contracts (and therefore scopes of work) are created equal. There are many ways to bring your building or home “into compliance” with the lead law. But many companies will take short-cuts or provide inadequate solutions in an attempt to cut down on costs, simply stating in their proposal that they will “bring the property into compliance” or some similar wording. While this might make for a nice, low price, these shortcuts can cause serious problems and cost you far more in the long run.

Recently, one of our clients had gone with the lowest cost contractor before finding us. The contractor’s proposal had simply stated their house would “be brought into compliance.” Since it wasn’t spelled out in the contract and the homeowners didn’t know all the myriad ways to satisfy the state requirements, their contractor opted to strip the non-compliant woodwork to 5 feet. While this is a valid way of satisfying the requirements of the law, it was hardly an appropriate solution for their turn of the century colonial. Their home’s lovely original woodwork was irreparably damaged by the deleading process, with gouges and deep grooves left in the wood. Not only that, but there was a very visible paint break line at the 5 foot mark throughout the house.

This homeowner was obviously unhappy with the end product, but the contractor had technically satisfied the wording of the contract. The house was in compliance with the lead law. Alpine was later hired to replace the woodwork with appropriate matching poplar trim. The work had to be done using lead safe work practices since the original woodwork still had lead paint on it above the 5 foot mark. The end result was a home that was safe for the clients and their young children to live in, with woodwork that looked great and matched the original architecture and style of the house.

The takeaway from this is to carefully read through every proposal or contract you receive, making sure they include clear descriptions of the work they intend to do. Don’t be afraid to invest a little extra money upfront if the company is properly licensed, includes extensive lead removal, and utilizes safe work practices. Sometimes the cheapest option isn’t the best option.

Questions or comments? Contact us today and our lead specialists will be happy to help.

The post Lead Abatement Costs & Contracts appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1483
National Center For Healthy Housing’s Hill Day: Lead Poisoning https://www.alpine-environmental.com/nchhs-lead-poisoning/ Tue, 19 Apr 2016 21:07:35 +0000 http://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1189 Back in February, Alpine’s president Ron Peik caught a flight down to Washington, DC. He was joining the National Center for Healthy Housing (NCHH) at their annual “Hill Day.” Ron and thirty industry leaders from across the U.S. met with over eighty Congressional offices on Capitol Hill to discuss the importance of sufficient support for healthy […]

The post National Center For Healthy Housing’s Hill Day: Lead Poisoning appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
d2f5ea00-c5b7-f538-0d33dd9db13b2bbfBack in February, Alpine’s president Ron Peik caught a flight down to Washington, DC. He was joining the National Center for Healthy Housing (NCHH) at their annual “Hill Day.” Ron and thirty industry leaders from across the U.S. met with over eighty Congressional offices on Capitol Hill to discuss the importance of sufficient support for healthy housing. The appalling situations in Flint, MI and hundreds of other American cities and towns have made lead poisoning and other environmental concerns big topics of discussion.

 

According to NCHH’s website,National Center for Healthy Housing

NCHH’s Hill Day works to raise the profile of healthy homes issues and recommend full funding for three crucially important federal programs – CDC’s Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, and CDC’s National Asthma Control Program.

At this event, members met with legislators and their staff to discuss policy regarding lead paint, lead poisoning, and healthy housing issues. Attendees also shared their personal experiences with environmental issues, explained the work they carry out to minimize these hazards, and described ways these types of programs have helped them. They emphasized the importance of offering proper assistance to homeowners, children and others affected by lead poisoning and other risks. Due to the complex and highly regulated nature of lead and other environmental hazards, it is especially essential to maintain robust, efficient support for those affected.

Increased funding alone, though, will not solve these problems. Ample education and monitoring of risks in conjunction with well-informed use of these funds are key. As the main programs in this industry, the CDC’s Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, and the CDC’s National Asthma Control Program were all discussed as good candidates for increased support. The event was a great opportunity to take an active role in the lead and environmental hazards industry.

For more information on the National Center for Healthy Housing, check out their website: www.nchh.org

The post National Center For Healthy Housing’s Hill Day: Lead Poisoning appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1189
Q&A: Lead Paint Encapsulation https://www.alpine-environmental.com/lead-paint-encapsulation/ Wed, 10 Feb 2016 19:02:07 +0000 http://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1159 Q. What is Lead Paint Encapsulation and how does it work? A. Encapsulation is a method of containing lead paint by covering the contaminated surfaces with a lead-safe liquid coating. And why not just paint over it? Unfortunately, regular paint isn’t enough because that too can peel or crack. Encapsulants are durable solutions serve as […]

The post Q&A: Lead Paint Encapsulation appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
lead paint chips, peeling lead paintQ. What is Lead Paint Encapsulation and how does it work?

A. Encapsulation is a method of containing lead paint by covering the contaminated surfaces with a lead-safe liquid coating. And why not just paint over it? Unfortunately, regular paint isn’t enough because that too can peel or crack. Encapsulants are durable solutions serve as a long-lasting barrier over lead paint. Besides using the proper materials, the lead paint encapsulation process has strict guidelines and prerequisites. Surfaces must be in good condition (not peeling or worn) and not in areas where the surface will be under a significant amount of wear and tear (such as floors). Additionally, by Massachusetts law you must have the building checked by a certified lead inspector before using encapsulant.

Once this is verified, the surfaces must be properly prepped either by a licensed professional or the homeowner. Preparation includes washing down and deglossing or sanding the surfaces (if it is a glossy paint or stain). The prepped surfaces can then be carefully painted with a State-approved encapsulant, such as Fiberlock’s Lead Safe products. While this might sound pretty simple, and a deleaders license isn’t legally required in some cases, basic lead paint encapsulation training must be completed before carrying out the work. This consists of a training booklet and at-home test that must be returned to the Massachusetts Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program.

Lead Paint Encapsulation

Once areas have been encapsulated, they should be monitored regularly to check for any chipping or wearing – this could expose the lead paint again and cause contamination. Overall, lead paint encapsulation is a safe and effective method of containing toxic lead, but it’s important to have a knowledgeable specialist to help you through the process. Our lead specialists at Alpine are happy to help, feel free to contact us with any questions!

For additional information and a list of approved encapsulants, click here.

The post Q&A: Lead Paint Encapsulation appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1159
The Winter Menace: Ice Dams https://www.alpine-environmental.com/winter-menace-ice-dams/ Mon, 21 Dec 2015 21:01:41 +0000 http://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1100 A cozy house with Christmas lights and sparkling icicles – a typical winter image. Those icicles might look pretty, but they’re actually a sign of poor insulation and, most likely, ice dams. After last winter, ice dams are particularly familiar to most people living in colder regions – unfortunately! While they might appear unassuming and harmless, […]

The post The Winter Menace: Ice Dams appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
A cozy houice damsse with Christmas lights and sparkling icicles – a typical winter image. Those icicles might look pretty, but they’re actually a sign of poor insulation and, most likely, ice dams. After last winter, ice dams are particularly familiar to most people living in colder regions – unfortunately! While they might appear unassuming and harmless, they can really wreak havoc on your home.

But how do these ice dams actually form? A warm attic (>32°F) melts snow on the roof, and colder outside temperatures (<32°F) cause the water to refreeze as it trickles down across the eave. The eave projects out beyond the house, so it’s unheated by the attic air. In the short time the water takes to cross the eave, it freezes one thin layer at a time until it builds up into an ice dam, often many inches thick. To avoid this problem, any paths for warm house air to enter the attic, such as bathroom fans, recessice dam diagram, ice dam removaled lights, etc., must be sealed up. Plus attics must be both well-insulated and well ventilated. The insulation lets less heat from the house enter the attic, and the ventilation flushes away any heated air that does get through. Besides ensuring your attic is well-insulated, heated gutter mats are a great option for preventing ice dams. Gutter cables are less effective since they only heat a small area and ice can still form in the gutters.

It can be overwhelming if your home is affected by ice dams and their accompanying issues, but the solution is actually pretty simple. Alpine’s fully insured and trained crews use safe and effective steam guns to cut through even the thickest ice. This divides the dams into manageable blocks which are then safely removed from the roof. If any water damage to the interior of your house has occurred, Alpine can also take care of this by drying the building materials out to prevent any further damage from occurring. Any unresolved issues can later cause significant mold growth and structural impairment, so a quick response is particularly important.

With ice dam removal projects costing around $1,500 or less, steam ice dam removal is a simple, inexpensive option for getting rid of troublesome and potentially disastrous ice dams before water starts flowing into your home. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions or ice dam problems and our team can bring their experience and expertise to your home!

  • After prepping the surrounding areas, Alpine crewmembers shovel excess snow before dicing up the ice dams with our steam gun.
  • High-powered steam safely and effectively slices through the thickest ice dams with no damage to the roof or surrounding areas.
  • Manageable blocks of ice are then slid off the roof onto cleared areas on the ground.

The post The Winter Menace: Ice Dams appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1100
6 Mold Facts https://www.alpine-environmental.com/mold-facts/ Tue, 01 Dec 2015 19:19:11 +0000 http://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1059 We encounter mold every day, but what do we really know about it? To get you started, here are 6 mold facts: Mold is often dismissed as a harmless annoyance. But mold can actually be a serious health problem. It can cause respiratory issues, sore throat, eye irritation, persistent cough, headache, and other illnesses – […]

The post 6 Mold Facts appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
We encounter mold every day, but what do we really know about it?

To get you started, here are 6 mold facts:

  1. Mold is often dismissed as a harmless annoyance. But mold can actually be a serious health problem. It can cause respiratory issues, sore throat, eye irritation, persistent cough, headache, and other illnesses – and you don’t even have to have come into direct contact to be affected.
  2. Mold loves moisture and dark spaces. However, significant water damage is not necessary for mold growth. Sometimes the slightest bit of dampness can cause mold growth to explode under the right circumstances.
  3. Mold is one of the only organisms that survives without sunlight. No chlorophyll is needed and it instead feeds on other plants and organic matter to survive. Unfortunately, this means that it usually grows in dark places hidden from sight.
  4. When mold isn’t causing trouble in a home or other structure, it can actually be quite useful. It plays a big part in nature’s recycling system by eating dead organic matter and speeding up the decomposing process, returning nutrients back into the soil faster.
  5. If left unnoticed or untreated, mold growth can start within 48 hours of mold spores being exposed to moisture and oxygen. Because of its quick growth response, it is easy for a little moisture to suddenly cause a big problem.
  6. Of course mold is technically visible, but it’s often hidden behind walls, up in attics, or down in basements. Sometimes a little detective work is necessary to find the source of the mold (a leaky faucet, poorly-insulated attic, etc.)

If these mold facts sparked any questions or concerns about your property, contact us today!

mold facts

The post 6 Mold Facts appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1059
2015 New Orleans National Lead and Healthy Housing Conference https://www.alpine-environmental.com/2015-new-orleans-national-lead-and-healthy-housing-conference/ Mon, 02 Nov 2015 18:10:00 +0000 http://www.alpine-environmental.com/?p=1014 From October 5th to 8th, the 2015 Lead and Healthy Housing Mid-Year Conference was held in sunny New Orleans. Sponsored in part by the Lead and Environmental Hazards Association (LEHA), the conference featured speakers such as the Louisiana Secretary for the Department of Health and Hospitals Kathy Kliebert. Alpine’s Ron Peik (also President of LEHA) and Ryan […]

The post 2015 New Orleans National Lead and Healthy Housing Conference appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
From October 5th to 8th, the 2015 Lead and Healthy Housing Mid-Year Conference was held in sunny New Orleans. Sponsored in part by the Lead and Environmental Hazards Association (LEHA), the conference featured speakers such as the Louisiana Secretary for the Department of Health and Hospitals Kathy Kliebert. Alpine’s Ron Peik (also President of LEHA) and Ryan DeMoura attended the conference with Ron delivering the opening remarks.

Topics at the event included creating a clean, safe indoor environment, collaborating with diversified groups to bring about program support and to result in increasing screening for lead poisoning, and updates on the Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) program. These conferences are a great way to stay up to date on the industry as well as to build a network of essential connections.

To learn more about the Lead and Healthy Housing Conferences, click here.

To learn more about the Lead and Environmental Hazards Association, click here.

 

The post 2015 New Orleans National Lead and Healthy Housing Conference appeared first on Alpine Environmental.

]]>
1014